All the science in one place.

"We have great hopes for this conference. By bringing so much wisdom together in one room we hope to take a step towards establishing the whole truth about bovine TB, and, in frank and open discussion, open a new era of genuine cooperation in the fight against this pernicious pathogen.” Dr Brian May 

Tickets available here https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/bovine-tb-symposium-2017-tickets-28649593706

9:00

Welcome

Dr Brian May

9:15

Opening remarks

Professor Lord Krebs Kt FRS FMed Sci

9:30

Bovine TB: A Strategic Overview

Professor Ian Boyd BSc PhD DSc FSB FSRE, Defra

 9:45

Section I: Cattle-based controls  Chair: Rosie Woodroffe

9:45

Performance of the current cattle tests

Prof James Wood, University of Cambridge

10:00

Welsh approach to TB eradication

Prof Christianne Glossop, Welsh Government

10:15

Improving cattle controls: insights from Scotland

Prof Rowland Kao, University of Glasgow

10:30

Improving cattle controls: new diagnostic tests?

Dr Cath Rees, University of Nottingham

10:45

TB Management at the front line: a veterinary perspective

Richard Sibley BVSc HonFRCVS, West Ridge Veterinary Practice

11:00

Coffee

 

11:30

Section II : Controlling badger population  - Chair: Glyn Hewinson

11:30

The Randomised Badger Culling Trial

Prof Christl Donnelly, Imperial College

11:45

Effectiveness & humaneness of farmer-led culls

Prof Tim Coulson, University of Oxford

12:00

Incidence of bovine TB in Somerset and Gloucestershire cull areas in Year 2 of industry-led badger culls

Dr Lucy Brunton BSc (hons) PhD, APHA

12:15

Replacing badger culling with vaccination in Ireland

James O'Keeffe, DAFM

12:30

Modelling the effects of localised badger culling

Dr Graham Smith, APHA

12:45

PCR-guided badger culling: could it work?

Prof Liz Wellington, University of Warwick Molecular

13:00

Lunch

 

14:00

Section III: Vaccination - Chair: Christl Donnelly

14:00

Cattle vaccination in Britain

Prof Glyn Hewinson, APHA

14:15

Badger Vaccination in Britain

Dr Freya Smith, APHA

14:30

Badger vaccination in the Republic of Ireland

Prof Eamonn Gormley, University College Dublin

14:45

Test & vaccinate/remove in Northern Ireland

Dr Fraser Menzies, DAERA

15:00

Section IV:  Farm biosecurity Chair: Dr Brian May

15:00

Improving cattle controls: risk-based trading

Dr Amie Adkin, APHA

15:15

Interactions between badgers and cattle

Prof Rosie Woodroffe, Institute of Zoology

15:30

How relevant is New Zealand to TB control in the UK

Dr Gareth Enticott, Cardiff University

15:45

Section V: Developing Policy Introduced by Dr Brian May

15:45

The TB control strategy for England

Nigel Gibbens, UK Chief Veterinary Officer

16:00

Tea/coffee

 

16:30

Panel Discussion: How should these new insights inform TB control policy? - Chair: Lord Krebs

 

Panel: Prof Sheila Bird (formerly, Medical Research Council),, Prof John Bourne (formerly, Institute of Animal Health), Professor Ian Boyd BSc PhD DSc FSB FSRE (Defra), Prof Neil Ferguson (Imperial College) Prof Christianne Glossop (Welsh Government), Dr Brian May (Save Me Trust) Prof James Wood (University of Cambridge) James O'Keeffe (DAFM) Ian McGrath

17:45

Closing statement and summary  Lord Krebs

To book tickets go to https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/bovine-tb-symposium-2017-tickets-28649593706

Bovine TB Symposium Tuesday 28th March 2017:   New insights into the control of bovine tuberculosis

Tuesday 28th March 2017 

“We have great hopes for this conference. By bringing so much wisdom together in one room we hope to take a step towards establishing the whole truth about bovine TB, and, in frank and open discussion, open a new era of genuine cooperation in the fight against this pernicious pathogen.”  Dr Brian May 

 

09:00   Welcome

Dr Brian May CBE PhD ARCS FRAS

A founding member of Queen, a world-renowned guitarist, songwriter, producer and performer, Brian is also a Doctor of Astrophysics, campaigner for animal rights and a passionate advocate for political and social change. A lifelong advocate of animal welfare, he campaigns from grass roots through to Parliamentary level with his Save Me Trust campaign, established in 2009 to champion British wildlife, working alongside Harper Asprey Wildlife Rescue and rehabilitation centre. Projects include rejuvenation of ancient woodlands to create protected wildlife habitats, and participation in TB control in specific herds. As a key player working alongside the major conservation and wildlife NGOs, the Save Me Trust created Team Fox and Team Badger - the largest ever wildlife coalition.  Brian was appointed Commander of the Order of the British Empire in 2005 for services to the Music Industry and for his charity work, and is patron to a number of charities, as well as a vice-president of the RSPCA.

 

09:15    Opening Remarks 

Professor Lord Krebs Kt FRS FMed Sci

John Krebs completed his undergraduate degree in Zoology and his PhD in population ecology at Oxford.  He worked at the University of British Columbia and the University of Wales before returning to Oxford as Lecturer in Zoology and then Royal Society Research Professor.  From 1994-99 he served as Chief Executive of the Natural Environment Research Council and from 2000-2005 as the founding Chairman of the Food Standards Agency. Between 2005 and 2015 he was Principal of Jesus College, Oxford  He is a cross bench peer.  In 1997, his report on bovine tuberculosis in cattle led to the establishment of the Randomised Badger Culling Trials (RBCT).

 

09:30 Bovine TB: A Strategic Overview

Professor Ian Boyd BSc PhD DSc FSB FSRE, DEFRA

Professor Boyd is the Chief Scientific Adviser to the UK Government on Food and the Environment.  In the past he has been director of the Scottish Oceans Institute at the University of St Andrews and 

focussing upon commercialisation and knowledge exchange.  He is on the Board of Reviewing Editors of Science and is a former editor-in-chief of the Journal of Zoology.  He was responsible for creating several companies that are owned by the University of St Andrews and these now have international subsidiaries in the USA, Canada and Hong Kong. He has BSc and DSc degrees from the University of Aberdeen, a PhD from Cambridge University and has received awards for his research including the Scientific Medal of the Zoological Society of London and the Bruce Medal for Polar Science from the Royal Society of Edinburgh.  He is also a Fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh and of the Society of Biology.

 

Section I: Cattle-based controls - Chair: Rosie Woodroffe

09:45   Performance of the current cattle tests

Prof James Wood, University of Cambridge 

Professor James Wood is an infectious disease epidemiologist and Head of University of Cambridge Veterinary School. He sits as an independent scientist on Defra TB Eradication Advisory Group and is a member of its Science Advisory Council. He has published more than 200 papers in international refereed journals and researches a number of diseases including bovine tuberculosis in Ethiopia, as well as in the UK.

 

10:00.   Welsh approach to TB eradication

Prof Christianne Glossop, Welsh Government

Christianne was appointed the first Chief Veterinary Officer for Wales in June 2005.  Working within the Welsh Government she heads up the Office of the Chief Veterinary Officer, and is Director responsible for animal health and welfare policy and strategy.  Her top priorities are to work with all interested parties to raise standards of animal health and welfare, ensure a state of preparedness for any incursion of exotic notifiable disease, and to drive forward the TB eradication programme in Wales. Christianne qualified from the Royal Veterinary College (RVC), London, where she also completed her PhD on aspects of cattle fertility.  She has specialised in food animal production and medicine throughout her career, with a particular interest in breeding technologies.  She is Past President of both the International and British Pig Veterinary Societies, and has also served on the Rare Breeds Survival Trust and British Veterinary Association Councils.  Joining the State Veterinary Service (now Animal and Plant Health Agency) during the 2001 Foot and Mouth Disease epidemic, her last role within that organisation was Divisional Veterinary  Manager in Reading. She is an Associate of the Royal Agricultural Societies, Honorary Fellow of the RVC and the University of Aberystywth, and holds an Honorary Doctorate from the University of Plymouth and from Harper Adams University. 

 

10:15    Improving cattle controls: insights from Scotland

Rowland Kao, University of Glasgow

Rowland Kao is the Professor of Mathematical Population Biology in the Institute of Biodiversity, Animal Health and Comparative Medicine at the University of Glasgow, and past director of the ‘Boyd Orr Centre for Population and Ecosystem Health’ (recipient of the Queen’s Anniversary Prize in 2013). In his research, he uses a combination of mathematical and statistical models to analyze the transmission of a number of infectious livestock diseases including bovine Tuberculosis in both cattle and wildlife, a subject he has worked on extensively for over two decades. This research includes the first ever use of bacterial whole genome sequencing to track bovine TB transmission between hosts, and the development of innovative approaches to surveillance at a national scale. Currently, he leads an extensive research programme that exploits combined genetic and epidemiological data to understand transmission dynamics of bovine TB in Britain, Northern Ireland, the Republic of Ireland and the US, as well as collaborating on related projects with teams in New Zealand, Brazil, and Spain. He leads an eight institution consortium developing ‘big data’ simulation models that will be used to inform DEFRA bovine TB control policy into the next decade. Today, he will discuss work his team developed to support the reduction of bovine TB testing in Scotland, and its potential implications for bovine TB control in the rest of Great Britain.

 

10:30     Improving cattle controls: new diagnostic tests?

Dr Cath Rees, University of Nottingham 

Dr. Rees expertise lies in the application of molecular biology to ask fundamental questions about micro-organisms of importance to the food industry. Specific areas of interest are the food borne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes and the cattle pathogens Mycobacterium paratuberculosis (Johne's disease in cattle) and Mycobacterium bovis (bovine TB). She also has extensive experience of working with bacteriophage, and her research group specializes in the use of phage to develop rapid methods of detection of bacterial pathogens

 

10:45    TB Management at the front line: a veterinary perspective

 Richard Sibley BVSc Hon FRCVS, West Ridge Veterinary Practice 

Director and Principal of West Ridge Veterinary Practice. Director of Myhealthyherd.com Ltd. Director and principal of West Ridge Veterinary practice, a commercial veterinary practice in rural South West England. I lead a team of 14 veterinary surgeons dealing mostly with cattle in this heavily stocked agricultural area, which is a hot spot for Bovine TB. Director of myhealthyherd.com, a web based health management programme which includes an infectious disease module which has been used widely in major disease programmes for infectious diseases such as Johnes and BVD, particularly in regional programmes in South West England.

Past secretary and president of the BCVA, and Honorary Lifetime member of BCVA

 

11:00.   Coffee/Tea Break Please return promptly by 11.25 for next speaker 

 

Section II. Controlling badger population - Chair: Glyn Hewinson

11:30.   The Randomised Badger Culling Trial

Prof Christl Donnelly, Imperial College, London

Prof Christl Donnelly was a member of the Krebs Committee in 1997 and was deputy chair of the Independent Scientific Group on Cattle TB from 1998 to 2007.  She has since taken part in several DEFRA-funded TB-related research projects, including the ongoing APHA-led project, monitoring and analysing TB incidence in cattle herds in areas subjected to licensed industry-led culling. More generally, she is a PI of the MRC Centre for Outbreak Analysis and Modelling with the Department of Infectious Disease  Epidemiology.  She has interests in a wide range of infectious diseases of humans, livestock and wildlife including Ebola, MERS, SARS, rabies, Zika, dengue, bovine TB and FMD.

 

11:45    Effectiveness & humaneness of farmer-led culls

Prof Tim Coulson, University of Oxford

Tim Coulson is a quantitative population biologist and Professor of Zoology at Oxford.  He is an expert on the management of free-living vertebrate populations, and has recently worked on badgers, deer, elephants, lions and wolves.  He is currently developing and applying general theory to predict how populations will respond to environmental change, including changes in rates of human-induced mortality.

 

12:00    Incidence of bovine TB in Somerset and Gloucestershire cull areas in Year 2 of industry-led badger culls

Dr Lucy Brunton BSc (hons) PhD, APHA

Dr Lucy Brunton is an epidemiologist with a background in microbiology. She joined APHA in 2010 and has recently been monitoring the effects of the badger culls in England on the incidence of TB in cattle. Since 2014 she has worked closely with the Welsh Government to produce the annual bovine TB surveillance report for Wales as well as the annual report on the Intensive Action Area. Her TB research has included investigating the spread of endemic bovine TB in England and Wales and the factors affecting this spread. Her research interests also include antimicrobial resistance in livestock and she has investigated the effects of feeding waste milk to calves on the presence of antibiotic resistant bacteria in calves and the farm environment. Lucy has recently left APHA to join the Royal Veterinary College as a Lecturer in molecular epidemiology.

 

12:15    Replacing badger culling with vaccination in Ireland

James O'Keeffe, DAFM 

I grew up in an intensive farming environment (pigs, dairy and beef farming) and I received my degree in Veterinary Medicine from Trinity College, Dublin in 1978.  I have worked in various capacities in the Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine (DAFM) since 1982.  Initially  I was a Veterinary Inspector (VI) in Counties Clare and later in Tipperary, where I was responsible for animal health programs in local areas comprising circa 1000 herds.  In 1991 I was seconded to a research post in University College, Dublin, where I concentrated on organising and analysing historical TB data and undertaking research projects.  In that role, I worked on the Kilkenny component of DAFMs Four Area Study which ran between 1997-2002.  In 2001 I was appointed to my current role, Head, Wildlife Unit.  This unit employs circa 90 outsourced contractors who primarily trap badgers, and are supervised/coordinated by circa 50 DAFM staff.  The Unit manages badger densities over an area equivalent to circa 35% of agricultural land where bovine TB has been proven to be endemic.   The Wildlife Unit also delivers the field components of DAFMs research on vaccination for badgers.  My field of specialist interest is epidemiology, and I’m an enthusiastic advocate of ONE HEALTH.

 

12:30   Modelling the effects of localised badger culling

Dr Graham Smith, APHA 

Dr Graham Smith is Lead Scientist for the National Wildlife Management Centre at APHA. He has worked on bovine TB and badgers for 20 years. Since field trials are so expensive and time consuming to perform, Graham specialises in collating field data from various sources including the Woodchester Park study site and producing robust simulation models. These models have been used to help direct further research in the field, and to help inform decision making for Defra, the Welsh Government and the Northern Irish government, in areas such as badger vaccination and culling.

 

 12:45.   PCR-guided badger culling: could it work?

 Prof Liz Wellington, University of Warwick

Molecular microbial ecologist, Director WESIC (Warwick Environmental Systems Interdisciplinary Centre), Leader Environment Bioscience Theme, School of Life Sciences. Molecular microbial ecologist, Director of WESIC (Warwick Environmental Systems Interdisciplinary Centre) Leader Environment Bioscience Theme, School of Life Sciences. Professor Liz Wellington is an active member of the Environment theme within the School of Life Sciences at the University of Warwick and director of Warwick Environmental Systems Interdisciplinary Centre (WES IC) at the University of Warwick. She holds a personal chair and, with her research group, is involved in the study of bacteria in soil and survival of pathogenic bacteria in the environment. The focus is on the link between environment and human health specialising in environmental reservoirs of pathogens, virulence and drug resistance genes. Research work has revealed several important pathogens survive in soil and can be a risk to human and animal health. In addition we have demonstrated how pollution, sewage disposal and farming activities impact on reservoirs of pathogens, resistance genes and mobile elements. Work with the causal agent of bovine TB Mycobacterium bovis resulted in development of a suite of techniques with a focus on in situ, culture independent analysis, community profiling, metagenomic library construction and statistical analysis of molecular data. 

 

The detection of significant levels M. bovis in the environment provided clues to transmission and shedding by infected animals. Additional research focuses on understanding activity of bacterial communities in soil, interactions with plants and the survival, activity and interaction of human, animal and plant pathogens with indigenous soil bacteria and the respective microbiomes.

 

13:00.   Lunch Please return promptly by 13.55 for next speaker 

 

Section III. Vaccination - Chair: Christl Donnelly

14:00.   Cattle vaccination in Britain

Prof Glyn Hewinson, APHA

Glyn Hewinson is currently the Lead Scientist for TB at the Animal and Plant Health Agency where he is responsible for all scientific aspects of bovine TB Agency. Prior to this he was Chief Scientist of the Animal Health and Veterinary Laboratories Agency. He graduated in microbiology from Bristol University, UK, and obtained a D. Phil in Microbiology from the University of Oxford, UK.He then moved to the Institute of Molecular Medicine at the same university, where he developed a keen interest in the molecular basis of bacterial pathogenesis. He was appointed Head of the TB Research Group at VLA Weybridge, UK, in November 1996, where he led a multidisciplinary team involved in the development of tuberculosis vaccines for badgers and cattle and of improved diagnostic tests for tuberculosis in these species. Glyn also introduced the use of genotyping of Mycobacterium bovis isolates for epidemiological purposes in GB. This has resulted in Glyn’s growing interest in the molecular evolution of M. bovis. Glyn was leader of the M. bovis genome-sequencing project and a member of the team that sequenced the genome of the current TB vaccine strain, BCG.

He is a visiting professor at Imperial College, London, a named OIE expert on bovine tuberculosis, a Jenner Investigator and a member of the Executive Committee of the Jenner Institute, University of Oxford and Chair of the Acid Fast Club (the UK’s Scientific Club for those with an interest in the mycobacterial infections including human TB). Recently Glyn was elected the first Chair of the Global Research Alliance for Bovine TB.

 

14:15.  Badger Vaccination in Britain

 Dr Freya Smith, APHA

Dr Freya Smith is a vet and an epidemiologist with a particular interest in multi-host pathogens capable of infecting wildlife. She cut her epidemiological teeth on the global amphibian ‘chytrid’ fungus, before moving into bTB research three years ago. Freya’s current work is focussed on understanding the epidemiology of TB in badgers and the potential role of wildlife disease control interventions such as vaccination. Freya is based at Woodchester Park in Gloucestershire and works for APHA’s National Wildlife Management Centre.

 

14:30   Badger vaccination in the Republic of Ireland

Prof Eamonn Gormley, University College Dublin  

Professor Eamonn Gormley completed an Honours degree followed by a PhD in Genetics (1988) at Trinity College Dublin. He carried out post-doctoral work for three years at the Pasteur Institute in Paris and from 1991-1998 worked at Massey University, New Zealand researching into the immune responses of cattle vaccinated with BCG. He returned to Ireland to lead a research program aimed at the development of a vaccine against tuberculosis for use in wildlife, funded by the Department of Agriculture, Food & the Marine (DAFM). He also manages the laboratory at University College Dublin (UCD) that carries out IFNγ blood testing on the national herd. He is involved in national and international studies on tuberculosis in cattle and wildlife and has active collaborations with groups in the US, EU, NZ and South Africa. The research conducted in his laboratory provides scientific evidence to support the government strategy to eradicate tuberculosis from the national herd and wildlife.

 

14:45.   Test & vaccinate/remove in Northern Ireland

Dr Fraser Menzies, DAERA     

Dr Fraser Menzies is the head of the Veterinary Epidemiology Unit within the Department of Agriculture, Environment and Rural Affairs (DAERA) in Northern Ireland.  He is the lead researcher within the badger test, vaccinate or remove (TVR)  research project currently being carried out in Northern Ireland.

 

Section IV – Farm biosecurity  Chair: Dr Brian May

 15:00.   Improving cattle controls: risk-based trading

Dr Amie Adkin

APHA Amie Adkin is a risk analyst specialising in animal and public health risk assessment with expertise in developing quantitative risk assessments and outbreak response, together with providing peer review and consultancy particularly in the areas of risk-based surveillance design, risk-based trading and biosecurity controls at the national and European level. Amie leads the Biomathematics and Risk Research Workgroup at APHA and has 15 years project management experience for national, European, and international scientific projects.

 

15:15   Interactions between badgers and cattle

Professor Rosie Woodroffe

Rosie Woodroffe is a Senior Research Fellow at the Zoological Society of London and a Visiting Professor at Imperial College London. A wildlife ecologist, she was a member of the Independent Scientific Group on Cattle TB, which oversaw the Randomised Badger Culling Trial from 1998 to 2007. She continues to conduct field research on TB in badgers and cattle in Cornwall.

 

15:30.   How relevant is New Zealand to TB control in the UK

Dr Gareth Enticott, Cardiff University

Dr Gareth Enticott is a Reader in Human Geography at Cardiff University. His research focuses on controversies in animal health and disease management, examining farmers’ biosecurity practices, the behaviour of veterinary surgeons and the governance of bovine tuberculosis in Great Britain and New Zealand.

 

Section V – Developing Policy - Introduced by Dr Brian May 

 15:45   The TB control strategy for England

 

Nigel Gibbens

Nigel Gibbens is the UK’s Chief Veterinary Officer. He was appointed in May 2008 following previous experience in the State Veterinary Service and in policy roles on international trade, BSE controls, animal welfare and international relations co-ordination for DEFRA’s Food and Farming Group. Prior to joining the UK government services in 1990, Nigel worked in private practice in his early career and in Government veterinary services in Belize and Yemen. He enjoys cycling, walking, at home and abroad, gardening and DIY. Nigel holds an Honorary Professorship from the Royal Veterinary College. He was appointed Commander of the Order of the British Empire (CBE) for services to the veterinary profession and animal welfare in the 2016 New Year’s Honours list.

 

16:00.   Coffee/Tea Break Please return promptly by 15;55 for next session

 

Panel Discussion: How should these new insights inform TB control policy? Chair: Lord Krebs

Professor Lord Krebs Kt FRS FMed Sci

John Krebs completed his undergraduate degree in Zoology and his PhD in population ecology at Oxford.  He worked at the University of British Columbia and the University of Wales before returning to Oxford as Lecturer in Zoology and then Royal Society Research Professor.  From 1994-99 he served as Chief Executive of the Natural Environment Research Council and from 2000-2005 as the founding Chairman of the Food Standards Agency. Between 2005 and 2015 he was Principal of Jesus College, Oxford  He is a cross bench peer.  In 1997, his report on bovine tuberculosis in cattle led to the establishment of the Randomised Badger Culling Trials (RBCT).

 

 Prof Sheila Bird (formerly, Medical Research Council)   

 During 2005-09, Sheila Bird was the Royal Statistical Society's (RSS) vice-president for external affairs and introduced both the RSS's statistical seminars for journalists and awards for statistical excellence in journalism: for which, in 2010, she was awarded the RSS's Chambers Medal.

Following swine-flu, on which she wrote a series of articles for Straight Statistics, Sheila Bird has led the Royal Statistical Society's campaign for legislation to end the late registration of deaths in England and Wales where fact-of-death is not registered for at least six months for one in five premature deaths (aged 5-44 years).

From 2006 to 2014, Sheila Bird and the late Colonel Clive Fairweather CBE, reported 20-weekly on military fatality rates in Afghanistan by nationality and cause.

In 2011, Sheila was appointed OBE for her services to social science and, in 2012, was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh.

 

Prof John Bourne      

Graduated Royal Vet College London 1960 B Vet Med, MRCVS – first in Vet Med.

1961-1966 General Veterinary practice Cornwall and Cotswolds.

Univ Bristol 1966 – 1980 Lecturer, Reader in Animal Husbandry; Ph.D.  Mucosal Immunology 1972. Prof Vet Med 1980 – 1988; Head of Vet School 1984 – 1988.

Director Institute for Animal Health 1988 – 1997; Vis Prof  Animal Health Univ Reading 1988 – 1987; Prof Animal health Univ Bristol 1988 – .

Chairman Gov. Independent Scientific Group for control of cattle (ISG) TB 1998-2007.

CBE  services to science 1994.

Foreign Member Polish Academy of Science 1994.

Fellow Edward Jenner Inst for Vaccine Research 2001.

Honorary Fellow The Pirbright Institute 2015.

Publications: over 250 in various scientific journals.

 

Professor Ian Boyd BSc PhD DSc FSB FSRE, DEFRA

Professor Boyd is the Chief Scientific Adviser to the UK Government on Food and the Environment.  In the past he has been director of the Scottish Oceans Institute at the University of St Andrews and the Sea Mammal Research Unit, a partner institute of the Natural Environment Research Council since 2001.  He is also currently an adviser to the Principal’s Office at the University of St Andrews focussing upon commercialisation and knowledge exchange.  He is on the Board of Reviewing Editors of Science and is a former editor-in-chief of the Journal of Zoology.  He was responsible for creating several companies that are owned by the University of St Andrews and these now have international subsidiaries in the USA, Canada and Hong Kong. He has BSc and DSc degrees from the University of Aberdeen, a PhD from Cambridge University and has received awards for his research including the Scientific Medal of the Zoological Society of London and the Bruce Medal for Polar Science from the Royal Society of Edinburgh.  He is also a Fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh and of the Society of Biology.

 

Prof Neil Ferguson, Imperial College   

Neil Ferguson is Director of the MRC Centre for Outbreak Analysis and Modelling and the NIHR Health Protection Research Unit for Modelling Methodology. He uses mathematical and statistical models to investigate the processes shaping infectious disease pathogenesis, evolution and transmission. One focus is on the use of models as contingency planning tools for emerging human infections (such as Zika, Ebola, MERS and pandemic influenza), bioterrorist threats and livestock outbreaks. He also leads a research programme on the dynamics and control of vector-borne diseases (Zika, dengue, yellow fever and malaria). Neil is a Senior Investigator of the National Institute of Health Research, a Fellow of the UK Academy of Medical Sciences and received an OBE for his work in 2001. He advises the UK and US governments, WHO and the EU on emerging infections and modelling.

 

Prof Christianne Glossop, Welsh Government

Christianne was appointed the first Chief Veterinary Officer for Wales in June 2005.  Working within the Welsh Government she heads up the Office of the Chief Veterinary Officer, and is Director responsible for animal health and welfare policy and strategy.  Her top priorities are to work with all interested parties to raise standards of animal health and welfare, ensure a state of preparedness for any incursion of exotic notifiable disease, and to drive forward the TB eradication programme in Wales. Christianne qualified from the Royal Veterinary College (RVC), London, where she also completed her PhD on aspects of cattle fertility.  She has specialised in food animal production and medicine throughout her career, with a particular interest in breeding technologies.  She is Past President of both the International and British Pig Veterinary Societies, and has also served on the Rare Breeds Survival Trust and British Veterinary Association Councils.  Joining the State Veterinary Service (now Animal and Plant Health Agency) during the 2001 Foot and Mouth Disease epidemic, her last role within that organisation was Divisional Veterinary  Manager in Reading. She is an Associate of the Royal Agricultural Societies, Honorary Fellow of the RVC and the University of Aberystywth, and holds an Honorary Doctorate from the University of Plymouth and from Harper Adams University.

 

Dr Brian May Brian May CBE PhD ARCS FRAS

 A founding member of Queen, a world-renowned guitarist, songwriter, producer and performer, Brian is also a Doctor of Astrophysics, campaigner for animal rights and a passionate advocate for political and social change. A lifelong advocate of animal welfare, he campaigns from grass roots through to Parliamentary level with his Save Me Trust campaign, established in 2009 to champion British wildlife, working alongside Harper Asprey Wildlife Rescue and rehabilitation centre. Projects include rejuvenation of ancient woodlands to create protected wildlife habitats, and participation in TB control in specific herds. As a key player working alongside the major conservation and wildlife NGOs, the Save Me Trust created Team Fox and Team Badger - the largest ever wildlife coalition.  Brian was appointed Commander of the Order of the British Empire in 2005 for services to the Music Industry and for his charity work, and is patron to a number of charities, as well as a vice-president of the RSPCA.

 

Nigel Gibbens

Nigel Gibbens is the UK’s Chief Veterinary Officer. He was appointed in May 2008 following previous experience in the State Veterinary Service and in policy roles on international trade, BSE controls, animal welfare and international relations co-ordination for DEFRA’s Food and Farming Group. Prior to joining the UK government services in 1990, Nigel worked in private practice in his early career and in Government veterinary services in Belize and Yemen. He enjoys cycling, walking, at home and abroad, gardening and DIY. Nigel holds an Honorary Professorship from the Royal Veterinary College. He was appointed Commander of the Order of the British Empire (CBE) for services to the veterinary profession and animal welfare in the 2016 New Year’s Honours list.

 

Prof James Wood, University of Cambridge 

Professor James Wood is an infectious disease epidemiologist and Head of University of Cambridge Veterinary School. He sits as an independent scientist on Defra’s TB Eradication Advisory Group and is a member of its Science Advisory Council. He has published more than 200 papers in international refereed journals and researches a number of diseases including bovine tuberculosis in Ethiopia, as well as in the UK.

 

James O'Keeffe, DAFM 

I grew up in an intensive farming environment (pigs, dairy and beef farming) and I received my degree in Veterinary Medicine from Trinity College, Dublin in 1978.  I have worked in various capacities in the Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine (DAFM) since 1982.  Initially  I was a Veterinary Inspector (VI) in Counties Clare and later in Tipperary, where I was responsible for animal health programs in local areas comprising circa 1000 herds.  In 1991 I was seconded to a research post in University College, Dublin, where I concentrated on organising and analysing historical TB data and undertaking research projects.  In that role, I worked on the Kilkenny component of DAFMs Four Area Study which ran between 1997-2002.  In 2001 I was appointed to my current role, Head, Wildlife Unit.  This unit employs circa 90 outsourced contractors who primarily trap badgers, and are supervised/coordinated by circa 50 DAFM staff.  The Unit manages badger densities over an area equivalent to circa 35% of agricultural land where bovine TB has been proven to be endemic.   The Wildlife Unit also delivers the field components of DAFMs research on vaccination for badgers.  My field of specialist interest is epidemiology, and I’m an enthusiastic advocate of ONE HEALTH.

 

Ian McGrath  

Farms 200 pedigree Holsteins in North Cheshire on 250 acres from intensive arable land to extensive parkland. First TB breakdown in 2002; spent longer since then under TB  restrictions than without restrictions. Founder member of Cheshire TB eradication group and member of TB eradication advisory group since 2012. Also member of Animal Health surveillance governance board. Has spoken on TB from Cornwall to the Scottish borders.

 

17.45 Closing remarks Lord John Krebs 

 

18:00. End of Symposium 

 

Thank you for attending today

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